One pandemic family law lesson: There’s more than one divorce option.

| Apr 15, 2021 | Mediation

The adverse health ramifications linked with the COVID-19 outbreak are obviously notable and heart-rending and must be prominently mentioned in advance of all other factors whenever the pandemic is referenced. The United States and global community are now hopefully poised for dramatic improvements on the health front after a long battle with the unprecedented health challenge.

The protracted health scourge has disrupted life for virtually every person over the past many months, and in myriad ways. This blog post spotlights resulting changes that have occurred in the family law realm, with dislocations reportedly spawning new thoughts and mindsets for many individuals considering divorce.

One recent article on divorce during COVID underscores that, noting as a baseline point that the virus has put a virtual halt on “normal” divorce processes and activities. Courts have shuttered their doors. Judges are focused on what that media piece terms “only the most serious and pressing cases.”

That new reality has given many would-be divorcing parties time to think about how they want their eventual decoupling to play out. Many of those parties have been uniformly locked in on the commonplace scenario of a litigated – spelled adversarial and formal – dissolution conducted under close judicial oversight, but they’ve now had some time to more closely consider things. One family law commentator states that many more impending exes are now “curious about what their options are.”

Which leads them toward consideration of divorce mediation. The above-cited article stresses the growing realization of many people contemplating divorce that a mediated process offers hope of a “more peaceful” marriage-ending solution than the “scorched earth” path marked by courtroom drama.

Many experienced and empathetic family law legal teams can speak to that, especially those comprising attorneys with a proven record of advocacy in nontraditional divorce representation.

“You can choose to separate in a dignified, healthy way that preserves what was good in your relationship,” states the aforementioned commentator.

A nonadversarial approach can help promote that salutary goal.